Tag Archives: Musical Theatre

Top 5 audition tips to help you get that part!

 

So the audition dates have been published and you’re thinking of going for a principal role. Perhaps you always succeed and play every leading part, or perhaps you’ve never managed to win the role you think you were born to play? Whichever camp you’d place yourself in, here are our top tips for getting through the audition and winning that role.

  1. Be honest with yourself

Listen to the director’s description of the character and read the lib carefully. If the director’s looking for an eighteen year old soprano and you’re a fifty year old alto, it’s probably not the right role for you. Similarly, if the part is a tap-dancing leading man and you have two left feet and an in-growing toenail, don’t waste anyone’s time. Think about the character and try to imagine yourself in that role. However, don’t be too hard on yourself – just be realistic.

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2. Be prepared

If you really want a role, it’s a good idea to try to learn the audition pieces and practice the songs. You need to sell it to the audition panel and doing this while looking at your lib or forgetting the song is not ideal. Learning the lines shows the panel that you want the part enough to have put in some effort. You should also have a good sense of the character you’re auditioning for. Read the whole lib and look for clues about the person you’re portraying, and listen to the director’s description too.

3. Don’t focus on the wrong things

Using props, costume or wigs in an audition is almost always a mistake. When you’re nervous and on the spot, it’s so easy for props to get you mixed up or confused, and costumes and wigs aren’t what the audition panel are looking for. Put your effort into inhabiting the character without distractions. Focus on the acting and singing and the panel will fill in the missing bits.

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4. Nerves can be your best friend

Most people find auditions more nerve-wracking than an opening night. There’s something about being so obviously judged that reduces the most experienced performer to a quivering jelly. So, since you can’t avoid the nerves, use them instead. Plan for them in advance and think about how you can use them to express emotion and depth in the audition pieces. This approach can work for acting and singing, but you need to have thought about how your nerves will affect you and how and where you will use this. When you need power or emotion, your nerves can be the fuel that makes your performance electric.

5. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket

If there are two parts that you can reasonably audition for, go for both – even if you really, really want only one of them. It never does any harm to show an audition panel what you can do. Auditioning for a second part shows more of your acting ability and more of your voice. It gives you longer to shine. And of course, if you don’t get the part you have your heart set on, you may get the other part. You’ll be disappointed for a time, but at least you have a part in the show.

Those are our top five tips, but if you fail despite these words of wisdom, there’s bound to be a place for you in the chorus. No show is a great show without a great chorus. Even when the principals are excellent, a poor chorus performance can ruin the atmosphere. So be a part of that well-oiled machine that is a great musical production – you’ll still have a wonderful time.

What’s new, Buenos Aires? Evita is coming in 2019!

We’ve written elsewhere on this site about the difficulty in getting one of the ‘crown jewel’ shows. But every now and then all the calls and pleading pay off. And so, in October 2019, we’re excited to bring Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s Evita to Abingdon.

The show tells the story of Eva Perón and her love affair with the people of Argentina in the late 1940s. It must have seemed a strange subject to choose to follow up the success of Jesus Christ, Superstar, and when Rice first suggested it to Lloyd Webber, he turned the idea down.

But in 1976, the pair released a concept album called ‘Evita’, with Julie Covington singing the role of Eva and Colm Wilkinson as Che. The first single from the album, ‘Don’t Cry For Me, Argentina’, went to number 1 in the UK charts, and a full staging of the show became inevitable.

Evita opened in the West End in 1978, with Elaine Paige as Evita and David Essex as Che, and ran for over 3,000 performances. The show also ran for 1,500 performances on Broadway. In 1996 it was turned into a movie, with Madonna taking the starring role.

Elaine Paige as Evita
Elaine Paige as Evita

Since then it has toured around the world in professional productions, with very few full amateur societies being given the opportunity to perform it.  Which explains why we’ve already had so much interest from our membership about this.  We’re certainly all looking forward to the auditions in the spring of 2019.

Top Hat! What an absolutely fantastic week we all had!

Top Hat, the stunning 2013 Olivier Award winner for ‘Best New Musical’ – Tue 23 to Sat 27 October 2018.

What can we say, except to thank all our audience for supporting us and making their appreciation so evident. The laughter was in all the right places, your applause was more than enthusiastic, and even your wolf whistles for Signor Beddini’s striptease were welcomed. We had a brilliant week, enjoying every minute of performing this show, and it’s so pleasing to know that our audience enjoyed it just as much.

To refresh your memory if you were able to join us, or to take a glimpse at what you missed, check out the gallery on our Flickr site here.